Glyn Johnson

Glyn Johnson

Professor

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Personal profile

Academic Background

  • 1974-1977: Pembroke College, Cambridge. BA Natural Sciences (Physics and Theoretical Physics).
  • 1977: Department of Biomedical Physics and Bioengineering, Aberdeen University. MSc Medical Physics.
  • 1978-1981: Department of Biomedical Physics and Bioengineering, Aberdeen University. PhD Medical Physics.

Biography

I have been involved in Magnetic Resonance Imaging research since 1978 and as a PhD student was a member of the research group at Aberdeen University that developed “spin warp imaging”, one of the key MRI technologies that is still the basis of most MRI methods. Since then, I have worked at a variety of Universities, both in the UK and the US on both fundamental MRI physics and engineering and the application of MRI in the clinic. Before moving back to the UK to take up my current position at UEA, I led the brain tumour imaging research group at New York University.

Career

  • 1981-1983: Research Assistant in NMR Imaging. Department of BioMedical Physics and BioEngineering, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen.
  • 1983-1988: Senior Physicist and Honorary Lecturer in NMR Imaging. Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London.
  • 1988-1994: Assistant Professor of Radiology, Department of Radiology, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York, New York.
  • 1994-2001: Assistant Professor of Radiology, Department of Radiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York.
  • 2001-2005: Associate Professor of Radiology, Department of Radiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York.
  • 2005-2012: Associate Professor of Radiology and Physiology and Neuroscience, Department of Radiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York.
  • 2012-present: Adjunct Associate Professor of Radiology, Department of Radiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York.
  • 2012-present: Professor of Clinical MRI Physics, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich.

External Activities

  • ISMRM annual meeting program committee member 2005-2007
  • Member of NIH study sections 2005-present
  • Reviewer for multiple academic journals 1984-present

Key Research Interests and Expertise

MRI is unsurpassed in demonstrating the presence of anatomical abnormalities throughout the body. However, it is often difficult to distinguish between different types of lesion from appearance alone. For example, the MRI appearance of some benign lesions can mimic the appearance of malignant tumours potentially leading to incorrect identification and inappropriate treatment. My main research interest is therefore in developing quantitative techniques that allow the resolution of these diagnostic problems, particularly in relation to cancer.

Research Keywords: MRI, Cancer

Research Topics for PGR Supervision: MRI

Selected Publications:

W. A. Edelstein, J. M. S. Hutchison, G. Johnson and T. W. Redpath, Spin warp imaging and applications to whole body imaging. Phys. Med. Biol. 25, 751-756 (1980).

  • G. Johnson, J. M. S. Hutchison, T. W. Redpath and L. M. Eastwood, Improvements in performance time for simultaneous three-dimensional NMR imaging. J. Magn. Reson. 54, 374-384 (1983).
  • G. Johnson and J. M. S. Hutchison, The limitations of NMR recalled-echo imaging techniques. J. Magn. Reson. 63, 14-30 (1985).
  • D. H. Miller, G. Johnson, W. I. McDonald, D. MacManus, E. P. G. H. du Boulay, B. E. Kendall and I. F. Moseley, Detection of optic nerve lesions in optic neuritis with magnetic resonance imaging. Lancet 1, 1490-1491 (1986).
  • G. Johnson, S. G. Wetzel, S. Cha, J. M. Babb, P. S. Tofts. Measuring blood volume and vascular transfer constant from dynamic, T2*-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI. Magn. Reson. Med. 51, 961-968 (2004).
  • M. Law, S. Oh, J. Babb, E. Wang, M. Inglese, D. Zagzag, E. A. Knopp, G. Johnson. Low-grade gliomas: Dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging—prediction of patient clinical response. Radiology 238, 658-667 (2006).
  • R. Trampel, J.H. Jensen, R. Lee, I. Kamenestkiy, G. McGuinness, G. Johnson, Pulmonary diffusional kurtosis imaging using hyperpolarized 3-helium. Magn. Reson. Med. 56, 733-737 (2006).
  • M. Law, J. Brodsky, J. Babb, M. Rosenblum, D.C. Miller, D. Zagzag, M.L. Gruber, G. Johnson. High cerebral blood volume in human gliomas predicts deletion of chromosome 1p: Preliminary results of molecular studies in gliomas with elevated perfusion. J. Magn. Reson. Im. 25, 1113-1119 (2007).
  • M. Inglese, G. Madelin, N. Oesingmann, J.S. Babb, W. Wu, B. Stoeckel, J. Herbert, G. Johnson. Brain tissue sodium concentration in multiple sclerosis: a sodium imaging study at 3 tesla. Brain 133, 847-857 (2010).
  • V. Patial, G. Johnson. Relaxivity in tissue.

Expertise related to UN Sustainable Devlopment Goals

In 2015, UN member states agreed to 17 global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all. This person’s work contributes towards the following SDG(s):

  • SDG 3 - Good Health and Well-being

Education/Academic qualification

Doctor of Philosophy, University of Aberdeen

Award Date: 1 Jan 1984

Master of Science, University of Aberdeen

Award Date: 1 Jan 1978

Bachelor of Arts, University of Cambridge

Award Date: 1 Jan 1977

Network

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