A summertime peak of "winter vomiting disease": Surveillance of noroviruses in England and Wales, 1995 to 2002

Ben A. Lopman, Mark Reacher, Chris Gallimore, Goutam K. Adak, Jim J. Gray, David W. G. Brown

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80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background:
Noroviruses are the most common cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks in industrialised countries. Gastroenteritis caused by Norovirus infection has been described as a highly seasonal syndrome, often referred to as "winter vomiting disease".

Methods:
The Public Health Laboratory Service Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre has systematically collected reports of laboratory confirmed cases of Norovirus-gastroenteritis since 1995. We analysed these data for annual and seasonal trends and age distribution.

Results:
A mid-summer peak in reported cases of Norovirus was observed in 2002, unlike all six previous years when there was a marked summer decline. Total reports from 2002 have also been higher than all previous years. From the first 10 months of 2002, a total of 3029 Norovirus diagnoses were reported compared the previous peak in 1996 of 2437 diagnoses for the whole 12-month period. The increase in 2002 was most marked in the 65 and older age group.

Conclusion:
This surveillance data challenges the view that Noroviruses infections exclusively have wintertime seasonality.
Original languageEnglish
Article number13
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume3
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Mar 2003

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