Asthma, body mass and aerobic fitness, the relationship in adolescents: the eXercise for Asthma with Commando Joe’s® (X4ACJ) trial Running head: Relationship between asthma, body mass and fitness

Charles O. N. Winn, Kelly A. Mackintosh, William T. B. Eddolls, Gareth Stratton, Andrew M. Wilson, Gwyneth Davies, Melitta A. McNarry

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Abstract

Although an association has been suggested between asthma, obesity, fitness and physical activity, the relationship between these parameters remains to be elucidated in adolescents.
Six-hundred and sixteen adolescents were recruited (334 boys; 13.0±1.1years; 1.57±0.10m; 52.6±12.9kg), of which 155 suffered from mild-to-moderate asthma (78 boys). Participants completed a 20-metre shuttle run test, lung function and 7-day objective physical activity measurements and completed asthma control and quality of life questionnaires. Furthermore, 69 adolescents (36 asthma; 21 boys) completed an incremental ramp cycle ergometer test.
Although participants with asthma completed significantly fewer shuttle runs than their peers, peak V̇O2 did not differ between the groups. However, adolescents with asthma engaged in less physical activity (53.9±23.5 vs 60.5±23.6minutes) and had higher BMI (22.2±4.8 vs 20.4±3.7kg·m-2), than their peers. Whilst a significant relationship was found between quality of life and cardiorespiratory fitness according to peak V̇O2, only BMI was revealed as a significant predictor of asthma status.
The current findings highlight the need to use accurate measures of cardiorespiratory fitness rather than indirect estimates to assess the influence of asthma during adolescence. Furthermore, the present study suggests that BMI and fitness may be key targets for future interventions seeking to improve asthma quality of life.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)288-295
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Volume38
Issue number3
Early online date27 Nov 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2020

Keywords

  • CARDIORESPIRATORY FITNESS
  • CHILDHOOD
  • CHILDREN
  • LUNG-FUNCTION
  • OBESITY
  • Obesity
  • PERFORMANCE
  • PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
  • POPULATION HEALTH MEASURE
  • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
  • SHUTTLE RUN
  • cardiorespiratory fitness
  • lung function
  • physical activity
  • quality of life

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