Carers’ and therapists’ views of internet-delivered guided self-help Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for family carers of people with dementia (iACT4CARERS): A qualitative study in the context of ethnic minority families

Naoko Kishita, Barbara Czyznikowska, Megan Riggey, Elien Van Hout, Erica Richmond, Rebecca L. Gould, Lance M. McCracken, Morag Farquhar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study aimed to explore the views of family carers of people living with dementia from ethnic minority groups and their therapists on internet-delivered, self-help acceptance and commitment therapy for family carers (iACT4CARERS), enhanced with additional therapist guidance. To achieve this, a qualitative approach with semi-structured interviews was employed with ethnic minority carers who completed Enhanced iACT4CARERS (n=9) and therapists who supported them throughout the programme (n=5). The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using framework analysis. Four over-arching themes were identified: (1) Value of the programme to ethnic minority carers, (2) Barriers for ethnic minority carers, (3) Sense of connectedness through written feedback, and (4) Sense of connectedness through one-to-one sessions. Theme 1 reflected that ethnic minority carers valued ACT techniques, highlighting their usefulness and simplicity, leading to perceived benefits. Theme 2 revealed the irrelevance of examples provided of carer experiences throughout the programme due to differences in family carers' experiences of providing care within ethnic minority communities. Theme 3 highlighted that carers' engagement with the programme was facilitated by feelings of validation and encouragement received from their therapist via weekly written feedback. Finally, Theme 4 highlighted that additional one-to-one support sessions allowed both carers and therapists to develop strong therapeutic relationships. This enhanced subsequent text-based online interactions, allowing carers to be more open and engaged. Also, therapists reported that a strong sense of connectedness helped them to tailor their feedback. Enhanced iACT4CARERS that uses carers' experiences more relevant to ethnic minority communities may be more acceptable. Key learning aims (1) To understand the views of family carers of people living with dementia from ethnic minority groups and their therapists on internet-delivered, self-help acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), which has been found to be feasible and acceptable with White British carers. (2) To understand whether additional one-to-one support can help develop effective therapeutic relationships and thus improve the experiences of carers in completing the programme. (3) To learn whether any cultural adaptations are needed to improve the acceptability of internet-delivered self-help ACT among this population.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere11
JournalCognitive Behaviour Therapist
Volume17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Mar 2024

Keywords

  • Diversity
  • Informal caregivers
  • Intervention acceptability
  • Online therapy
  • Therapeutic relationship

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