Classification of protein domain movements using Dynamic Contact Graphs

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Abstract

A new method for the classification of domain movements in proteins is described and applied to 1822 pairs of structures from the Protein Data Bank that represent a domain movement in two-domain proteins. The method is based on changes in contacts between residues from the two domains in moving from one conformation to the other. We argue that there are five types of elemental contact changes and that these relate to five model domain movements called: ‘‘free’’, ‘‘openclosed’’, ‘‘anchored’’, ‘‘sliding-twist’’, and ‘‘see-saw.’’ A directed graph is introduced called the ‘‘Dynamic Contact Graph’’ which represents the contact changes in a domain movement. In many cases a graph, or part of a graph, provides a clear visual metaphor for the movement it represents and is a motif that can be easily recognised. The Dynamic Contact Graphs are often comprised of disconnected subgraphs indicating independent regions which may play different roles in the domain movement. The Dynamic Contact Graph for each domain movement is decomposed into elemental Dynamic Contact Graphs, those that represent elemental contact changes, allowing us to count the number of instances of each type of elemental contact change in the domain movement. This naturally leads to sixteen classes into which the 1822 domain movements are classified.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere81224
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Nov 2013

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