Conservative and disruptive modes of adolescent change in human brain functional connectivity

František Váša, Rafael Romero-Garcia, Manfred G. Kitzbichler, Jakob Seidlitz, Kirstie J. Whitaker, Matilde M. Vaghi, Prantik Kundu, Ameera X. Patel, Peter Fonagy, Raymond J. Dolan, Peter B. Jones, Ian M. Goodyer, NSPN Consortium, Petra E. Vértes, Edward T. Bullmore

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49 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Adolescent changes in human brain function are not entirely understood. Here, we used multiecho functional MRI (fMRI) to measure developmental change in functional connectivity (FC) of resting-state oscillations between pairs of 330 cortical regions and 16 subcortical regions in 298 healthy adolescents scanned 520 times. Participants were aged 14 to 26 y and were scanned on 1 to 3 occasions at least 6 mo apart. We found 2 distinct modes of age-related change in FC: “conservative” and “disruptive.” Conservative development was characteristic of primary cortex, which was strongly connected at 14 y and became even more connected in the period from 14 to 26 y. Disruptive development was characteristic of association cortex and subcortical regions, where connectivity was remodeled: connections that were weak at 14 y became stronger during adolescence, and connections that were strong at 14 y became weaker. These modes of development were quantified using the maturational index (MI), estimated as Spearman’s correlation between edgewise baseline FC (at 14 y, FC14) and adolescent change in FC (ΔFC14−26), at each region. Disruptive systems (with negative MI) were activated by social cognition and autobiographical memory tasks in prior fMRI data and significantly colocated with prior maps of aerobic glycolysis (AG), AG-related gene expression, postnatal cortical surface expansion, and adolescent shrinkage of cortical thickness. The presence of these 2 modes of development was robust to numerous sensitivity analyses. We conclude that human brain organization is disrupted during adolescence by remodeling of FC between association cortical and subcortical areas.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3248-3253
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume117
Issue number6
Early online date28 Jan 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Feb 2020

Keywords

  • Allen Human Brain Atlas
  • Connectome
  • Head movement
  • MRI
  • Neurodevelopment

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