Cultural differences in levels of autonomous orientation in autobiographical remembering in posttraumatic stress disorder

Laura Jobson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated cultural differences in levels of autonomous orientation (the tendency to express autonomy and self-determination) in autobiographical remembering in those with and without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Trauma survivors with PTSD and without PTSD from individualistic and collectivistic cultures (N = 101) provided self-defining, everyday and trauma autobiographical memories. Memories were coded for levels of autonomous orientation and interdependence. It was found trauma survivors from individualistic cultures with PTSD had lower levels of autonomous orientation in their autobiographical remembering than trauma survivors from individualistic cultures without PTSD. In contrast, trauma survivors from collectivistic cultures with PTSD had higher levels of autonomous orientation in their autobiographical remembering than trauma survivors from collectivistic cultures without PTSD. The results suggest the cultural distinction in self-impacts on the relationship between the nature of autobiographical remembering and posttraumatic psychological adjustment.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-182
Number of pages8
JournalApplied Cognitive Psychology
Volume25
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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