Dietary intake and status of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in a population of fish-eating and non-fish-eating meat-eaters, vegetarians, and vegans and the product-precursor ratio [corrected] of α-linolenic acid to long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids: results from the EPIC-Norfolk cohort

Ailsa A Welch, Subodha Shakya-Shrestha, Marleen A H Lentjes, Nicholas J Wareham, Kay-Tee Khaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

167 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intakes of n-3 (omega-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are important for health. Because fish is the major source of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), non-fish-eaters may have suboptimal n-3 PUFA status, although the importance of the conversion of plant-derived α-linolenic acid (ALA) to EPA and DHA is debated.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1040-1051
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume92
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2010

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Animals
  • Cohort Studies
  • Diet
  • Diet Records
  • Diet, Vegetarian
  • Fatty Acids, Omega-3
  • Female
  • Fishes
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Meat
  • Middle Aged
  • Seafood
  • Sex Factors
  • alpha-Linolenic Acid

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