Illusory Sensation of Movement Induced by Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

Mark Schram Christensen, Jesper Lundbye-Jensen, Michael James Grey, Alexandra Damgaard Vejlby, Bo Belhage, Jens Bo Nielsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Human movement sense relies on both somatosensory feedback and on knowledge of the motor commands used to produce the movement. We have induced a movement illusion using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over primary motor cortex and dorsal premotor cortex in the absence of limb movement and its associated somatosensory feedback. Afferent and efferent neural signalling was abolished in the arm with ischemic nerve block, and in the leg with spinal nerve block. Movement sensation was assessed following trains of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation applied over primary motor cortex, dorsal premotor cortex, and a control area (posterior parietal cortex). Magnetic stimulation over primary motor cortex and dorsal premotor cortex produced a movement sensation that was significantly greater than stimulation over the control region. Movement sensation after dorsal premotor cortex stimulation was less affected by sensory and motor deprivation than was primary motor cortex stimulation. We propose that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over dorsal premotor cortex produces a corollary discharge that is perceived as movement.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere13301
JournalPLoS One
Volume5
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Oct 2010

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