Motivational influences on compliance with and consequences of instructions to suppress stereotypes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two experiments investigated differences in compliance with instructions to suppress stereotypes as a function of prejudice-related motivations. In Experiment 1, only participants identified as high in motivation to control prejudice [Dunton, B. C., & Fazio, R. H. (1997). An individual difference measure of motivation to control prejudiced reactions. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 23, 316-326] complied with suppression instructions. These participants experienced post-suppression rebound effects, but only if they were also high in prejudice. In Experiment 2, only participants identified as high in external motivation to respond without prejudice [Plant, E. A., & Devine, P. G. (1998). Internal and external motivation to respond without prejudice. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 75, 811-832] complied with instructions to suppress. These participants later experienced stereotype rebound effects, but only if they were also low in internal motivation to respond without prejudice. These findings suggest that motivational factors play an important role in determining not only the outcome of suppression, but also the choice to attempt suppression in the first place. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)417-424
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2007

Keywords

  • stereotype suppression
  • prejudice
  • motivation

Cite this