Stakeholder experiences of deprescribing psychotropic medicines for challenging behaviour in people with intellectual disabilities

Danielle Adams, Richard P. Hastings, Ian Maidment, Chetan Shah, Peter E. Langdon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Evidence of overprescribing of psychotropic medicines to manage challenging behaviour in people with intellectual disabilities has led to national programmes within the UK to promote deprescribing, such as stopping the overprescribing of medication in people (with learning disabilities, autism or both). To successfully implement deprescribing initiatives, we need to understand how to engage stakeholders in the process. Design/methodology/approach: In a published systematic review, we reported evidence about the process of deprescribing psychotropic medicines for people of all ages with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour. As a part of the original review, we searched for evidence about stakeholders’ experiences of the psychotropic deprescribing process, which was synthesised and reported within the current study. Findings: Six studies were identified. Involving carers and people with intellectual disabilities, providing ongoing support and improving access to non-pharmacological interventions, including positive behaviour support, may contribute to successful outcomes, including reducing or stopping psychotropic medicines and improving quality of life. Implementing psychotropic deprescribing requires a multidisciplinary collaborative care approach and education for stakeholders. Originality/value: There have been no previous reviews of stakeholder experiences of deprescribing psychotropic medications for people with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour. The existing literature is scant, and further research is needed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalTizard Learning Disability Review
Early online date30 Jan 2024
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 30 Jan 2024

Keywords

  • Challenging behaviour
  • Learning disabilities

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