The role of resilient coping in dementia carers' wellbeing

Susan May Jones, Anne Killett, Eneida Mioshi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background:
Carers of people with dementia are at risk of psychological distress. However, some carers experience positive outcomes and resilient coping may account for this variance in carers' wellbeing.
Aims:
To assess the role of resilient coping in dementia carers' wellbeing.
Methods:
A cross-sectional survey of carers measured resilient coping, depression, anxiety, stress and burden. First, group comparisons between carers with high, medium and low resilient coping were made. Next, mediation analyses were conducted to identify if resilient coping was a mediator in the relationships between carer wellbeing and distress.
Findings:
Carers (n=110) were aged 30–80+ years; 66% female; 72% provided 40+ hours care per week; 23% were highly resilient. Highly resilient carers report significantly less distress than low resilient carers. Resilient coping was a partial mediator in the relationships between wellbeing and depression, anxiety, stress and burden.
Conclusions:
Interventions promoting or maintaining resilient coping may reduce morbidity in family carers.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6-12
JournalBritish Journal of Neuroscience Nursing
Volume15
Issue number1
Early online date22 Feb 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2019

Cite this