The trials of urine specimen collection when diagnosing a urinary tract infection in the adult female population

Linda Collins, Mwanaisha Yawawa, Monday Ugiagbe, Chrysi Leliopoulou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The urinary tract consisting of the kidneys, ureters, urethra and the bladder are commonly invaded with a urinary tract infection. Frequently caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) and recognized as the offending microbe responsible for a urinary tract infection. The objective of this study was to explore the perspectives relating to the challenges of collecting a midstream urine specimen when diagnosing a urinary tract infection.

Methods: A descriptive-interpretive qualitative research approach was adopted, and thirty female participants enrolled into the study were recruited from a specialist center for acute and chronic urinary tract infections. Semi-structured interviews were conducted as part of a wider study, and the NVivoTM software was used to organize and group the data into thematic insights.

Results: The experiences of producing a midstream urine specimen were challenging, but despite the trials, it was regarded as the most adequate method that would diagnose the presence of a urinary tract infection.

Conclusions: Exploring the perspectives relating to the challenges of collecting a midstream urine specimen when diagnosing a urinary tract infection was fundamental. The interview data provided diverse perceptions of the trials and challenges encountered during urine specimen collection and the diagnostic process.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAnnals of Infection
Volume8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Mar 2024

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